“There are short cuts to happiness and dancing is one of them” – Vikki Baum

NEW STUDENT SPECIAL!
1 PRIVATE LESSON – ONLY $49

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

“There are short cuts to happiness and dancing is one of them” – Vikki Baum

NEW STUDENT SPECIAL!
1 PRIVATE LESSON- ONLY $49

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

DANCE YOUR WAY TO BETTER HEART HEALTH?

A regular whirl on the dance floor may lower your odds of dying from heart disease, a new study suggests.

The study included 48,000 people in the United Kingdom who answered questions about their dancing and walking habits over the past month. All were 40 years and older with no history of heart disease and agreed to be linked to the National Death Registry.
After an average follow-up of nearly 10 years, researchers found that moderate-intensity dancing was linked to a lower risk of cardiovascular death. The American Heart Association recommends dancing as aerobic exercise to reduce the risk of heart disease.

A study published in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology found that dancing is as good for weight loss and increased aerobic power as cycling and jogging. Half an hour of constant dancing can burn an estimated 200 to 400 calories. It also improves your muscle tone, so your shape will get an upgrade too. Celebrate these achievements with a happy dance!

Dancing enhances general and psychological well-being while increasing self-confidence and self-esteem. It helps relieve depression and feelings of isolation by stimulating the production of endorphin hormones that combat stress. According to a study published in the International Journal of Neuroscience, dance contributes to the regulation of serotonin and dopamine, neurotransmitters that prevent depression. With so many benefits shouldn’t you be dancing as well?

AND THE BEST NEWS OF ALL – IT’S REALLY A LOT OF FUN

“Dance is a joyful, fun and effective way for seniors to stay active and healthy,”

– agrees fitness expert Pamela Peeke, M.D. a spokesperson for the American College of Sports Medicine.