“There are short cuts to happiness and dancing is one of them” – Vikki Baum

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“There are short cuts to happiness and dancing is one of them” – Vikki Baum

NEW STUDENT SPECIAL!
1 PRIVATE LESSON- ONLY $49

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

NATIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS SOCIETY

 Whether it’s a fabulous foxtrot, a lively line dance or a tremendous tango, dancing is great for your bones and enormous fun. But dancing is not just about fun – it’s great for the body, mind and bones too!

“The health benefits of dancing are well established,” says Dr Peter Lovatt, a dance psychologist and Reader and Principal Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Hertfordshire. “When people engage in different types of social dance, there’s a measurable change in their mood.

“They become less fatigued, less depressed, their levels of vigor go up and there are positive changes in their cognitive processing. Even five minutes of dancing makes people think more sharply and laterally,” he says

Dance contributes to heart and lung health and is a great workout for toning and strengthening muscles. It also helps to maintain a healthy weight and strengthens the bones

This is something many people involved in dance and physical exercise do seem to agree on – dancing really is good for your bones.

Back in 2008, the National Osteoporosis Society really caught the dance bug. Dancing is a fantastic way of keeping your bones strong, It’s invigorating, a great weight-bearing exercise and, above all else, is really fun.

Dancing is great for your bones when you’re young, but it’s also a good thing at any stage of our lives, because it strengthens your muscles and even reduces your risk of a breaking a bone.

And the really good news is, there’s some scientific evidence to back all of this up. Dr Kate Ward, a Senior Research Scientist at MRC Human Nutrition Research in Cambridge. “We do know that certain types of dance are weight bearing and that weight-bearing exercise helps to build and maintain bones and muscles. As well as this, dancing may help maintenance of a healthy weight and balance, which are also important as we get older to prevent falls and fractures.”

Dawn Skelton, a Professor of Ageing and Health at Glasgow Caledonian University, says the impact on bones through dance is one of its most important benefits. “Dancing will help improve bone strength,” she says. “Most studies have shown potential effects on the spine but few on the hip.”

Dance does improve balance and many other risk factors for falls, so even if the effect on bone is not strong, if people reduce their chances of falling, they are less likely to fall and fracture.

Dance to Health. Keep fit, enjoy good company, and have fun. This article was taken from the Osteoporosis News archives, Autumn 2016